BASIC ALGEBRA GLOSSARY

Mr. X is glad to provide video presentations of hundreds of basic algebra glossary terms. The basic algebra glossary is part of a complete math glossary available free of charge on the website. All basic algebra glossary terms are provided free of charge to all users.

A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z  

Title Description
Abscissa The horizontal axis, or the first coordinate in an ordered pair.
Play_video
Absolute Maximum The highest point on a graph, especially over a specified domain.
It is the greatest value of f(x) over a defined interval of x, provided y=f(x).
Play_video
Absolute Minimum The lowest point on a graph, especially over a specified domain.
It is the least value of f(x) over a defined interval of x, provided y=f(x).
Play_video
Absolute Value The distance on the real number line between a value and zero.
It applies best to things for which negative values have no meaning, such as mass or length.
Play_video
Accuracy The quality of approaching an exact value.
Distinct from precision, accuracy means to approach correctness, to tend toward an established value.
Play_video
Addition The process of finding a sum or determining a total by joining values together.
Values are summed in the process to result in a total.
Matrix addition adds elements of matrices of the same order (or dimension).
Vector addition results in the diagonal of a parallelogram (if in two dimensions).
Play_video
Algebra The branch of mathematics that allows manipulation of symbols and values to determine quantities that are not always fixed.
Variables are essential to algebra.
Play_video
Algorithm A sequence of steps to accomplish a familiar task; a recipe. Play_video
Alpha The first letter of the Greek alphabet. Play_video
Argument of a Function The term or expression upon which a function operates.
In y=f(x), the argument of the function is x.
Play_video
Arithmetic A branch of mathematics built upon the basic operations of addition, subtraction, division, and multiplication.
Powers, roots, and logarithms are often considered arithmetic in nature.
Play_video
Arithmetic Mean What we generally consider to be the average.
The sum of a set of values divided by the cardinal number of the set of values.
Play_video
Arithmetic Progression Also Arithmetic Sequence.
A series of terms where successive terms are obtained by addition of a constant.
Play_video
Arithmetic Sequence Also Arithmetic Sequence.
A series of terms where successive terms are obtained by addition of a constant.
Play_video
Arithmetic Series Akin to Arithmetic Progressions and Arithmetic Sequences, the series typically reflects an addition operator between terms, as a sum. Play_video
Associative Law of Addition Provides that addition of groups of terms or values is indifferent to the order of grouping.
We may add terms in any order, or group them in any order.
Play_video
Associative Law of Multiplication Provides that multiplication of groups of terms or factors is indifferent to the order of grouping.
We may multiply factors in any order, or group them in any order.
Play_video
Average Most commonly, average means the arithmetic mean; we sum the values and divide that sum by the number of numbers.
The average between two real values is the midpoint between those values.
Play_video
Average Rate of Change The change in value divided by elapsed time. Play_video
Axes Most simply, the plural of axis.
More generally, the horizontal x-axis and the vertical y-axis that comprise the skeleton of Cartesian Coordinates.
Play_video
Axiom Accepted without proof (unlike a theorem), an axiom is readily understood and regarded as fact. Play_video
Axis In physics, a line about which a body rotates.
In mathematics, a line that divides a plane or space into two equal halves, typically demarcated in units.
Play_video
Base (Exponential) Any value that is raised to a power is termed a base value.
That power is typically expressed as an exponent, and that exponent could be an integer, a decimal value, or a fraction.
The base is the number or expression being raised to the power of the exponent.
Play_video
Beta Beta is the second letter of the Greek alphabet. Play_video
Biconditional A biconditional statement has literally two conditions.
The classic If-Then statement is the biconditional with a hypothesis and conclusion.
Play_video
Binomial A binomial has two terms.
Terms are usually separated by plus signs or minus signs.
Play_video
Binomial Coefficients Binomial coefficients are found in Pascal's Triangle.
We use these coefficients to raise binomials to successive powers as well as to determine the number of combinations or ways we can take a number of objects from a set of objects.
Play_video
Box-and-Whisker Plot In statistical data, a box-and-whisker plot is sometimes used to graphically represent quartiles.
Quartiles are the extremes of the body of data, as well as the 25th, 50th and 75 percentiles.
Play_video
Braces Braces act just like parentheses.
Always (almost) used in pairs, braces look like this: { }.
Play_video
Brackets Brackets act just like parentheses, coming in pairs to group data or terms. Play_video
Cardinal Number The number of objects or elements within a set is the Cardinal Number of the set. Play_video
Cartesian Coordinates The familiar x-y coordinate plane is called the plane of Cartesian Coordinates; it is named for Rene Descartes.
Play_video
Cartesian Plane The Cartesian Plane contains the familiar x-axis and y-axis in which we plot ordered pairs.
It is the familiar Rectangular Coordinate system.
Play_video
Change-of-Base Formula There is an easy way to change the bases between logarithms.
A simple formula, the Change-of-Base formula is an acquired taste.
Play_video
Chi The twenty-second letter of the Greek alphabet. Play_video
Closed Interval A segment of the real number line including the endpoints. Play_video
Coefficient A number that indicates the multiple of an algebraic term.
In a polynomial, a coefficient is the numeric value preceding the variable(s) that is to be multiplied times the variable(s).
Play_video
Cofactor Typically the result of taking a determinant, it is a number associated with an element in a matrix. Play_video
Common Logarithm The base-ten logarithm is often called the Common Logarithm. Play_video
Common Ratio In a geometric progression, subsequent terms are obtained by multiplication of terms by a constant called the Common Ratio. Play_video
Composite Number Composite Numbers relate to positive integers that are not prime.
If a positive integer has factors other than itself and one, it is a Composite Number.
Play_video
Compound Interest When the Time Value of Money generates interest and that interest is added to the principal to increase the amount of money to which subsequent interest is added, this is Compound Interest. Play_video
Computation Computation is the act of taking values and logical mathematical steps to make a calculation. Play_video
Conclusion When mathematical conclusions are valid the laws of math and science have been adhered to, and a logical approach has been taken.
Sometimes conclusions are invalid because scientific or mathematic rigor has not been adhered to.
Reason and judgment are often important to reaching sound or valid conclusions.
Play_video
Conjugates Conjugates multiply to simpler entities based on changing the operator between terms of each conjugate from positive to negative, or vice versa. Play_video
Consistent System of Equations When a system of equations has at least one solution (and most often a unique solution) the equations are said to be Consistent. Play_video
Constant A mathematical value that never changes is said to be constant.
Real numbers are constants because their value never changes.
In a polynomial, a term with a variable (or variables) raised to the zero power is constant.
Play_video
Continuous A function is considered Continuous if its graph has no gaps, no holes, no steps, and no cusps or discontinuities. Play_video
Coordinate A value associated with the location of a point is a Coordinate.
In one dimension a Coordinate is a single value.
In two dimensions, a point is defined by two Coordinates as an ordered pair.
Play_video
Coordinate Plane Two-dimensional entities are graphed or plotted in a plane, such as the rectangular plane or Cartesian Plane.
Two-dimensional polar coordinates are also plotted in a plane.
It requires an ordered pair to specify a location in a plane.
Play_video
Correlation When two variables have a strong linear relationship, either increasing proportionally or one variable decreasing as the other increases, we say there is (strong) Correlation between the variables. Play_video
Countable In common language, countable just means reasonably enumerated or countable, as in there are not too many objects to physically count.
In human terms, the grains of sand in the Sahara Desert are not countable.
But mathematically they actually are.
So Countable means something a little different to the mathematicians.
Play_video
Cube Root Given a real value, the Cube Root is the number or value that, when raised to the third power, equals the given real value.
We multiply the cube root of a value times itself and times itself again to obtain the given value.
Play_video
Cubic A Cubic is a third-order polynomial. Play_video
Decimal Digits to the left of the decimal point represent Integer Values.
Digits to the right of the decimal point represent Decimal Fractions.
All place values whether to the left or the right of the decimal point are successive powers of 10.
The term decimal comes from the latin decimus which means tenth.
In common language, base 10 numbers with digits to the right of the decimal point are considered decimal values.
Play_video
Decimal Fraction Most simply, decimal fractions are the digits to the right of the decimal point. Play_video
Decreasing Decreasing means to lessen in extent or scope, to be reduced.
A function is considered to be Decreasing if the values in the range decrease as the values from the domain increase.
Play_video
Degree (Polynomial) The Degree of a polynomial is the order, or highest power (term) of the polynomial. Play_video
Delta Delta is the fourth letter of the Greek alphabet.
Upper-case Delta looks like a triangle and is used to mean "the change in..."
Play_video
Denominator The Denominator of a fraction is the number on the bottom; it is the divisor of the numerator. Play_video
Dependent Variable If y = f(x), then y is a function of x and y is the Dependent Variable.
Think of it this way: whatever we get for output "y" depends on the input "x" we grab from the domain of the function.
Play_video
Direct Proportion When variables are in Direct Proportion to one another they have the relation that as one variable grows the other either increases or decreases by a constant multiplication factor.
When y = kx, we say the variables are in Direct Proportion.
Play_video
Direct Variation Also direct proportion, Direct Variation describes the relation y = kx. Play_video
Discriminant In the Quadratic Formula, the radicand (the business inside the square-root sign) is the Discriminant.
In general, a Discriminant provides algebraic information about the roots of polynomials.
Play_video
Distance A length from one point to another is considered a Distance.
Any measurement in one dimension confers a length, which is Distance.
Play_video
Distance Formula The familiar Distance Formula in Cartesian (rectangular) coordinates is a version of the Pythagorean Theorem, where the sum of the squares of the legs of a right triangle is equal to the square of the hypotenuse. Play_video
Distributive Property Given a sum to be multiplied by an outside factor, we may distribute the multiplicative factor over the addends of the sum.
The result is that each addend of the sum is multiplied by the outside factor; we then sum the individual products.
Example: 3 x (4z + 5) = 12Z + 15.
More simply: 5 x (7 + 2) = 5 x 7 + 5 x 2, also written 35 + 10, which is 45.
Of course, the original 5 x (9) is 45.
So, relax.
It's so, so easy.
Play_video
Division The process of finding a quotient or a ratio.
One of the four basic operations of arithmetic, division begins with a dividend that is to be divided by, or segmented into parts, by a divisor.
The result of dividing the dividend by the divisor is called the quotient.
Play_video
Domain The values that are "legal" and "legitimate" to put into a function are the elements of the Domain of that function.
When y = f(x), the legitimate values of x are the Domain of the function.
Play_video
Doubling Time The time it takes an exponential or geometric growth to double in size (grow by 100 percent of the original value) is its doubling time. Play_video
Equality A statement where two or more values are deemed to have an equal or identical value is a statement of Equality. Play_video
Equation A statement of equality, or equal value, is termed an Equation.
When we solve an Equation we solve for some entity or value that makes the statement true.
Play_video
Evaluate When we Evaluate an expression we determine its value or the value of some entity within it to (typically) make the statement true. Play_video
Even (Integer) Even integers end with one of the following five digits: 0, 2, 4, 6, or 8.
These digits are considered Even and the integers that end with them are also considered Even.
When Even integers are divided by two the quotient is an integer.
Play_video
Even Function Even Functions are symmetrical about the y-axis, provided they are expressed as y = f(x).
Even Functions adhere to the following: f(-x) = f(x).
Play_video
Exact Precise to the fullest extent possible.
Complete and entirely accurate.
Right on.
Play_video
Explicit Ideas or notions directly expressed or understandable are considered Explicit. Play_video
Exponent Usually written as a superscript, an Exponent is a number or entity to which some other value is raised, as a power. Play_video
Expression A mathematical statement of almost any kind is considered an Expression. Play_video
Factor (noun) The noun Factor is a value that is multiplied with another Factor (or factors) to result in a product.
That product of two or more factors is the result of the operation of multiplication.
Play_video
Factor (verb) The verb Factor is the act of dividing some entity into components or pieces that, when multiplied together, produce the given entity.
We "break apart" some real value or quantity into its multiplicative factors when we Factor.
Play_video
Factor Tree A Factor Tree is a written mechanism to see the factors or prime factors of some value (usually an integer, but not necessarily). Play_video
Factorial A Factorial results from the multiplication of successive positive integers.
The term Factorial is either a function or a number, depending on its specific use.
Play_video
Fibonacci Numbers This set of numbers itself grows without bound, but the ratio of successive terms in the series converges to the golden ratio. Play_video
First Order Polynomial This type of equation has no variables raised to integer powers greater than one. Play_video
Fixed Fixed terms or values are constant, never changing value. Play_video
FOIL (FIOL) A mnemonic for remembering "first-outside-inside-last" for multiplication of two binomials.
It is equivalent to FIOL, as we take the sum of products.
Play_video
Formula A recipe or algorithm for calculation, evaluation, simplification, or just about anything we do in mathematics can be called a Formula. Play_video
Fraction Fractions are many, many things.
But always, without fail, fractions are the result of dividing the top value (numerator) by the bottom value (denominator).
Play_video
Fractional Exponents Real values can be raised to powers that are integers, decimals, or fractions.
Fractional Exponents can be thought of as having a denominator that is the root of the value being raised to the power, with a numerator akin to an integer power.
Play_video
Function Function takes on several meanings in the language of mathematics.
A typical connotation is a relation between variables where for any input (an independent variable or element from the domain) we have a unique output (element in the range, or dependent variable result).
Play_video
Gamma Gamma is the third letter of the Greek alphabet.
Play_video
General Form for Equation of a Line Such a form has integer coefficients for both x and y when describing a line in Cartesian (rectangular) coordinates.
Play_video
Geometric Mean The Geometric Mean of two real values is the square root of the product of the two values.
More generally, the Geometric Mean of n values is the nth root of the product of the n values.
Play_video
Geometric Progression This term is used for geometric series, geometric sums, or geometric sequences when subsequent terms result from multiplication by a constant that is most often called the common ratio.
Play_video
Geometric Series A Geometric Series is a form of geometric progression.
Play_video
Googol Ten raised to the power of one hundred equals one Googol.
Play_video
Googolplex Ten raised to the power of a googol is a Googolplex; it is a huge number.
Play_video
Greatest Common Factor The GCF of two integers (usually) is the largest integer that divides evenly into both integers.
We sometimes use GCF for non-integral values.
Play_video
Greek Anyone interested in learning mathematics should embrace the Greek alphabet with 24 letters from alpha to omega.
Play_video
Half-Life When some entity experiences exponential decay (reduction or diminution) the times it takes to lose half of its size (or strength) is its Half-Life.
Play_video
Height Altitude.
How tall something is, measured in some perpendicular fashion to the "bottom" is its height.
Play_video
Hexahedron A six-faced polyhedron is termed a Hexahedron.
Play_video
High Quartile The 75th percentile.
Also upper quartile.
Play_video
High Quintile The 80th percentile; upper quintile.
Play_video
Horizontal Horizontal comes from orientation like the horizon; parallel to the "flat" surface of the earth; perpendicular to vertical.
Play_video
Hypotenuse The longest side of a right triangle is the Hypotenuse; it is always opposite the 90-degree angle (or right vertex).
Play_video
Hypothesis In a biconditional statement the hypothesis is followed by a conclusion.
In the scientific method, the hypothesis is the conjecture to be proved or disproved.
Play_video
i, Square Root of -1 The small-case i is reserved for the square-root of a negative one; the square of i is -1.
Play_video
Identity As opposed to a conditional statement that is sometimes true, an Identity will always be true.
The multiplicative identity is 1; the additive identity is zero.
Play_video
Identity Property of Addition The Identity Property of Addition says that adding zero to (or subtracting zero from) any real value will not change the value.
Play_video
Identity Property of Multiplication The Identity Property of Multiplication says that multiplication of a real value by one (or division by one) will not change the value.
Play_video
If-and-Only-If (Iff) A statement that shows a condition both necessary and sufficient for the assertion.
Play_video
If-Then Statement The classic biconditional statement is often phrased as an If-Then proposition.
Play_video
Impossibility Despite what some "possibility thinkers" espouse, some things are mathematically impossible.
For example, an exact real number cannot be simultaneously irrational and rational.
Play_video
Incircle A circle inscribed within a regular polygon (or any triangle) is an Incircle.
In a regular polygon, the radius of the Incircle is the apothem.
Play_video
Inconsistent Inconsistent equations have no simultaneous solution.
Play_video
Increasing If the values in the range of a function increase as the values of the domain increase, the function is said to be Increasing.
Play_video
Independent Variable The set of values from the domain of a function comprise the values for the Independent Variable, the input variable into the function.
Play_video
Inductive Logic Inductive Logic is the logic of after-the-fact, or a posteriori.
It results from observation of transpired events.
Play_video
Inequality Real numbers can be compared using one of the following four forms: less than (<), less-than-or-equal-to (≤), greater than (>), or greater-than-or-equal-to (≥).
Statements that use these comparisons are inequalities.
If two real numbers are not equal, one has to be greater than the other.
Play_video
Infinite In common language, not countable in any practical manner.
In math, having no bounds or boundary.
Play_video
Infinite Geometric Progression When a geometric progression has a common ratio less than one (technically, a common ratio whose absolute value is less than one), then the Infinite Geometric Progression will converge to a limit.
Play_video
Infinitesimal Infinitely small is Infinitesimal, so tiny that it occupies no space.
While in human terms anything really small (a molecule) is Infinitesimal, in math the term means approaching zero in size.
Play_video
Infinity That without bound; limitless.
Play_video
Inscribed Circle This term is the same as Incircle, a circle inscribed within a polygon.
Play_video
Integer An Integer is a whole number or its negative.
When expressed as a decimal, an Integer has nothing to the right of the decimal point (in American style).
Play_video
Interest Given the time-value-of-money, Interest is generated on a sum of capital as time passes.
Play_video
Interior Interior means within or "in-between." Play_video
Interquartile Range The Interquartile Range is the half of overall data between the 25th and 75th percentiles.
Play_video
Intersection Where geometric entities cross, or where sets have common elements, is termed an Intersection.
Play_video
Interval The space or region between two defined values is an Interval.
Play_video
Interval Notation With brackets or parentheses, depending on whether endpoints are included in the set, Interval Notation expresses the solution set for an inequality.
Play_video
Invariant Constant.
Not changing.
Static.
That which does not vary.
Play_video
Inverse Inverse carries a lot of meanings within the language of mathematics.
Play_video
Inverse Variation Variables or factors that multiply to a constant value.
The relation between two variables, when their product is constant, are said to be in a relation of Inverse Variation.
Play_video
Inverse, Conditional Given an initial if-then statement, the negative of both the hypothesis and conclusion provides the Inverse to the original statement.
Play_video
Inversely Proportional The relationship between two variables when the product of two variables is a constant.
Two variables in a relation of Inverse Variation are said to be Inversely Proportional.
Play_video
Iota The ninth letter of the Greek alphabet, Iota means a very small amount.
Play_video
Irrational Number A real number that cannot be expressed exactly as the ratio of two integers.
Irrational Numbers, when expressed as decimals, never repeat or terminate.
Play_video
Iteration A procedure that repeats, typically by adding some value to a variable in the process with each new calculation is called an iterative process, and each cycle of the calculation is an Iteration.
A computational procedure in which a cycle of operations is repeated, often to approximate the solution to a problem.
Play_video
Joint Variation Joint Variation is identical to direct variation; as one variable increases so, too, does the other variable increase proportionally.
Play_video
Jump A step within a function is sometimes termed a Jump.
Play_video
Lambda Lambda is the eleventh letter of the Greek alphabet and is used for wavelength in physics.
Play_video
Leading Coefficient We usually write polynomials with the first term having the highest order, or power.
The coefficient of this leading term is literally the Leading Coefficient.
Play_video
Leading Term The first term in a polynomial, most typically the highest-order term, is the Leading Term of the polynomial. Play_video
Least Common Denominator When two or more fractions are being summed we want the LCD to facilitate the operation of addition.
Play_video
Least Common Multiple The LCM is most typically applied to integers.
It is the smallest value evenly divisible by each number for which we seek the LCM.
Play_video
Leg, Triangle Most generally the legs of a triangle refer to the perpendicular sides of a right triangle only.
Play_video
Like Terms Like Terms have the same variables raised to identical powers.
Play_video
Line A collection of points that comprise the shortest path between two points in Euclidean geometry is a Line; all points in a Line are collinear and, of course, coplanar.
Play_video
Line Segment A section of a line, with endpoints on both ends, is a Line Segment.
Play_video
Linear As the first four letters imply, Linear means "of a line" or "lined up" in a collinear fashion.
Play_video
Local Maximum A Local Maximum is a high spot on the graph of a function.
Also termed a relative maximum, it is the greatest value within a defined neighborhood.
Play_video
Local Minimum A Local Minimum is a low spot on the graph of a function.
Also termed a relative minimum, it is the least value within a defined neighborhood.
Play_video
Loci The points that comprise a function (or graph thereof) are its Loci.
Play_video
Locus A single point on a function or on its graph is a Locus.
Play_video
Logarithm A Logarithm is a number associated with a power and a base; the function is the inverse of an exponential function.
Play_video
Logic Logic takes many forms and is instrumental in understanding the language of mathematics.
Play_video
Lower Quartile Also first quartile, it is the 25th percentile, where 75 percent of the data is greater than this value.
Play_video
Lower Quintile The 20th percentile; also first quintile.
Play_video
Magnitude (Powers of Ten) When we multiply a real number times ten, we increase its magnitude by one.
When we divide a real number by ten, we decrease its magnitude by one.
Very much like place value, "orders of magnitude" refer to powers of ten, where greater place values indicate a greater magnitude.
Conversely, lesser place values indicate a decrease in magnitude.
Play_video
Matrix A rectangular array of numbers is often called a Matrix.
Play_video
Matrix Addition Matrix Addition applies to matrices of like order, the same size.
Play_video
Maxima The plural of maximum.
Maxima are "high spots" on the graph of a function.
Play_video
Maximize A process to establish the greatest extent, value, or size possible.
Play_video
Maximum A highest value.
A local Maximum is the highest value of a function within some defined neighborhood.
Play_video
Measure A noun or verb, Measure implies comparison to an established standard.
Play_video
Measurement The result from comparison to an established standard, Measurement may be exact only to an agreed-to precision.
Play_video
Median, Data The Median of a set of data is the value in the middle of an ordered or sorted list, with just as many values higher than the Median as lower than the Median.
Play_video
Midpoint Every line segment (or side of a polygon) contains a point equidistant from the endpoints (or vertices), the Midpoint.
Play_video
Midpoint Formula A simple recipe for finding the Midpoint of a line segment in Cartesian or rectangular coordinates.
Add the x-coordinates of the endpoints of the line segment and divide by two for the x-coordinate of the midpoint.
The y-value follows similarly.
Play_video
Minima The plural of minimum.
Minima are low points on the graph of a function.
Play_video
Minimize A process to establish the least extent, value, or size possible.
Play_video
Minimum A low point or least value in the neighborhood of the graph of a function is a Minimum, the singular of minima.
Play_video
Minute, Time One-sixtieth of an hour comprises one Minute of time.
Play_video
Mixed Number We may write an "improper" fraction as a whole number followed immediately with a "proper" fraction.
Such a form is termed a Mixed Fraction.
Play_video
Mode While Mode can take on several meanings in mathematics, it generally is used for the value of data with the greatest frequency of occurrence in a list of values.
Play_video
Monomial A single term.
Casually, "term" and "monomial" are synonymous; strictly, a term is a monomial without a coefficient.
Play_video
Mu The twelfth letter of the Greek alphabet, Mu is used for both the mean and median in a normal distribution.
Play_video
Multiplication You know, times.
The operation to simplify addition of identical values.
You should learn your Times Tables, the basic facts of Multiplication.
Play_video
Multiplicative Inverse Another name for Multiplicative Inverse is reciprocal.
Reciprocals multiply to one.
Play_video
Natural The set of Natural Numbers is also the set of counting numbers, the same numbers we learn to count when we're little kids: 1, 2, 3, 4....
Precisely in the language of math these are the positive integers.
Play_video
Natural Logarithm The base of the Natural Logarithms is e, approximately 2.718.
At 100 percent annual interest with continuous compounding over a year, the multiplication factor of principal is precisely e.
Play_video
Natural Numbers The set of Natural Numbers is also the set of counting numbers, the same numbers we learn to count when we're little kids: 1, 2, 3, 4....
More precisely in the language of math these are the positive integers.
Play_video
Negative Real values less than zero are Negative.
We also consider the Negative of a real value to have the opposite sign, as the opposite (or Negative) of a Negative value is Positive.
Play_video
Negative Number A real value less than zero is a Negative Number.
Play_video
Negative Reciprocal The product of two Negative Reciprocals is -1.
When lines in Cartesian or rectangular coordinates meet at right angles they have Negative Reciprocal slopes, unless they are precisely horizontal and vertical.
Play_video
Non-collinear Not linear, not aligned, not part of the same line.
Not collinear.
Play_video
Nonagon A nine-sided polygon.
Play_video
Nonnegative We have occasions to refer to all positive values as well as to zero.
These are all the real values that are Nonnegative.
Literally, not negative.
Play_video
Nonzero Literally, not zero.
Typically used to mean either positive or negative values.
Play_video
Nth Degree Simply raised to the degree of integer (usually) n, or N.
In common, everyday language, to pursue something excessively, as parents giving the suitor of their teenage daughter an interrogation "to the nth degree."
Play_video
Nth Root Given some integer N and a real value, the Nth Root of the real value is the number that when raised to the N power returns the real value. Play_video
Nu Nu is the 13th letter of the Greek alphabet.
Play_video
Null Set The Null Set is the empty set.
Mathematically there is but one empty set, the unique Null Set, the set with nothing in it.
Play_video
Number Line The real Number Line is a depiction of the set of all real numbers from negative infinity to positive infinity.
All real numbers lie on the Real Number Line.
Play_video
Numerator The top number in a fraction, above the fraction bar, is the Numerator.
It is the dividend to be divided by the divisor, which is the denominator.
Play_video
Octagon An eight-sided polygon.
Play_video
Octant As we have four quadrants in the rectangular plane, we have eight Octants in rectangular space.
In three dimensions the three axes divide space into eight sections, each termed an Octant.
Play_video
Odd In common language: strange or unusual.
For integers, numbers ending with any of these digits: 1, 3, 5, 7, or 9.
Play_video
Odds The likelihood or probability of an event or specific outcome is termed the Odds of the event occurring.
Odds, or probabilities, are always represented with values between 0 and 1, or between zero and 100 percent (inclusively).
Play_video
Omega The last, or 24th, letter of the Greek alphabet is Omega.
Upper-case Omega is used for ohms, a unit of electrical resistance.
Lower-case Omega is used for angular velocity, a speed of rotation.
Play_video
Omicron The 15th letter of the Greek alphabet.
We don't use it in math because it looks just like an "o" or a zero.
Play_video
One-Dimensional Linear, or along one line of direction.
Informally, constrained to stay along a narrow line.
Play_video
Open Interval A section of a line whose set does not include the endpoints is considered an Open Interval.
Play_video
Operation The processes of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division are each termed an Operation.
So, too, is raising a value to a exponent.
Play_video
Opposite Many meanings are found for Opposite, including having direction 180 degrees from an original direction, or having the negative sign of a previous sign.
Opposite real values have identical absolute values.
Play_video
Order (Polynomial) The Order of a Polynomial relates to the highest power of variables in a term, typically the Order of the leading term of the Polynomial. Play_video
Order of Operations We have a hierarchy of Order to Operations in the language of mathematics.
We do multiplication before we do addition, and we also work left-to-right.
We work first inside of expressions within parentheses, then outward.
Play_video
Order, Polynomial The Order of a Polynomial relates to the highest power of variables in a term, typically the Order of the leading term of the Polynomial.
Play_video
Ordered Pair Two coordinates are required to label a point in a plane, typically (x, y).
Play_video
Ordered Triple Three coordinates are required to label a point in space, typically (x, y, z).
Play_video
Ordinal Number Ordinal Numbers are ordinary numbers, or the sequential references of order as first, second, third, and so on.
Play_video
Ordinate In Cartesian or rectangular coordinates, the y-axis, or the coordinate from the y-axis; the second coordinate in an ordered pair.
Play_video
Origin In one dimension: (0).
In two dimensions: (0,0).
In three dimensions: (0, 0, 0).
Play_video
Orthogonal Most generally Orthogonal means perpendicular to a plane.
Play_video
Outcome A specific event is often termed an Outcome.
Play_video
Outlier When plotting data points, as in a scatterplot, if a single data point is far removed from the neighborhood of the other data points, such a far-removed data point is called an Outlier.
Play_video
Parabola The graph of a quadratic function is a Parabola, a conic section.
Play_video
Parallel Lines Coplanar Lines that never meet or cross are Parallel.
If lines simply never cross, they may be skew (non-coplanar).
Play_video
Parametric Equation In a general sense, we have a Parametric Equation when we define something in specific terms of something else.
Play_video
Parentheses Symbols ( ) serve to isolate or group written entities.
Play_video
Parenthesis Symbols ( ) serve to isolate or group written entities.
Play_video
Pascal's Triangle Pascal's Triangle is an important device for understanding binomial expansion and combinatorics.
Play_video
Pentagon A five-sided polygon.
Play_video
Percent Literally, per hundred.
Percents are equivalent to Fractions where the numerator reads as the percent and the denominator is 100.
Play_video
Percentage Any reference to percent is a Percentage; the fraction of 100 a value represents.
Play_video
Percentile Certain types of data lend themselves to description by what percent of the values exceed (or fall below) a specific data value.
A Percentile states what percent of the data is less than the specific data value.
Play_video
Perfect Square A Perfect Square is simply a number, value, or mathematical expression that results from any of these entities multiplied by itself.
Most generally a Perfect Square is an integer that is the product of another integer times itself.
Play_video
Perimeter The distance around the outside of a planar object or a plane figure is its perimeter.
Play_video
Permutation A specific order to the grouping of objects in a combination is termed a Permutation.
Play_video
Perpendicular At right angles.
Play_video
Phi The twenty-first letter of the Greek alphabet.
Play_video
Pi The constant ratio of circumference to diameter is represented by the 16th letter of the Greek alphabet; it is approximately 3.14159.
Play_video
Plane An infinite expanse of points in two dimensions.
Play_video
Plus A symbol for addition, or the operation itself.
Play_video
Point A location of infinitesimal size, that is, no size.
A mathematical idea.
Play_video
Point-Slope Equation A handy algebraic relation to obtain an equation of a line from a given point and slope.
Play_video
Polygon A closed plane figure with straight sides.
Play_video
Polynomial A series of terms (or a single term, a monomial), usually with at least one variable; terms are separated by plus signs or minus signs. Play_video
Population Statistically when we sample a Population we generally seek a representative sample.
A Population is the group from which we take a sample.
Play_video
Positive Real values are Positive when they are greater than zero.
Play_video
Postulate A far-reaching conjecture or sense of reasoning for which an obvious and substantive base appears most reasonable.
Play_video
Power Power most often means the value of an exponent.
In advanced mathematics, a type of series where an infinite number of terms are raised to successive integer powers.
Play_video
Precision The quality of finer measurement or estimation is termed Precision. Play_video
Prime Factorization The process of finding the prime factors of a composite number is called Prime Factorization.
Play_video
Prime Number A positive integer evenly divisible by itself and one but no other integers is considered a Prime Number.
Play_video
Principal An amount, typically money, upon which the time value of money (accumulation of an added percentage over a defined time) generates interest is termed Principal.
Play_video
Probability The likelihood of an event or particular outcome is its Probability.
All Probabilities are between 0 and 1 (between zero percent and 100 percent).
Play_video
Product The result of the operation of multiplication is called a Product.
Play_video
Proper Subset A set that is a subset of a given set and not identical to the given set is a Proper Subset of the given set.
Play_video
Proportional In a (constant) ratio.
Play_video
Psi The 23rd letter (next-to-last) of the Greek alphabet.
Play_video
Pyramid A geometric solid with a base of a polygon and planar lateral sides that meet at a point called an apex is termed a Pyramid.
Play_video
Pythagorean Triple A series of three integers for whom the Pythagorean relation holds, as 3-4-5 or 5-12-13, because 3² + 4² = 5² and 5² + 12² = 13².
Play_video
Quadrangle Another name for a quadrilateral, a four-sided polygon.
Play_video
Quadrant One of the four areas of the rectangular or Cartesian plane that is divided into fourths by the two axes.
Play_video
Quadratic A second-order polynomial of the form ax² + bx + c = 0 is considered a Quadratic; it graphs to a parabola. Play_video
Quadratic Equation Any second-order polynomial in one variable set equal to a constant is termed a Quadratic Equation.
Play_video
Quadruple A verb or noun; to multiply by four or the fourth integral multiple, respectively.
Play_video
Quartiles Most generally, the 25th and 75th percentiles are termed the Low Quartile and High Quartile, respectively.
Play_video
Quintiles Most generally, the 20th and 80th percentiles are termed the Low Quintile and High Quintile, respectively.
Play_video
Quintuple A verb or noun; to multiply by five or the fifth integral multiple, respectively.
Play_video
Quotient The result of the operation of division, the Quotient results from dividing a dividend by a divisor; also the value of a fraction that is always numerator divided by denominator.
Play_video
Radical A root symbol.
Strictly, the radical is the type of root, with the number of the root expressed as an index and an absence of an index indicating a square root; the radicand is the number expressed within the radical.
Informally, simply a square root.
Play_video
Radicand A number taken to a root is a Radicand; the number under a root sign or written inside a Radical. Play_video
Radius One-half the diameter of a circle is the Radius.
It is the distance from the center of a circle to any point on the circle.
Play_video
Range We may speak of a Range of values as simply the difference between high and low values of a data set.
More specifically, the values generated by the input of domain values into a function map into the Range of values of the function.
Play_video
Ratio Sometimes Ratio is meant to state a constant proportion.
More generally, the Ratio of two real values is the quotient that results from dividing one number by the other.
Play_video
Rational A Rational number can be expressed as the ratio of two integers.
When expressed as a decimal, a Rational number will either repeat or terminate (with repeating zeros).
Play_video
Rational Expression Mathematical statements written as fractions with a numerator and a denominator are often termed Rational Expressions.
Play_video
Ray A set of collinear points, a Ray has an endpoint and proceeds infinitely far in a single direction.
Play_video
Real Number Situated on the Real Number line, a real value is either less than, equal to, or greater than every other real value.
Play_video
Reciprocal Every nonzero real value has a Reciprocal.
A number and its Reciprocal multiply to one.
We may find a Reciprocal of a number by dividing it into 1.
Play_video
Rectangle A quadrilateral with many special properties, including all those of a parallelogram, and then some.
Play_video
Rectangular Coordinates The familiar x-y coordinate plane; Cartesian Coordinates.
Play_video
Reflexive Literally "in relation to itself." When we say A = A, we employ a Reflexive property.
Play_video
Regular Polygon A Regular Polygon is both equilateral (all sides congruent) and equiangular (all angles congruent).
Play_video
Regular Prism A Prism with bases of Regular polygons.
Play_video
Regular Pyramid A Pyramid with a base of a Regular polygon.
Play_video
Relative Maximum Also a local Maximum, a high spot on the graph of a function.
It is the greatest value within a defined neighborhood.
Play_video
Relative Minimum Also a local Minimum, a low spot on the graph of a function.
It is the least value within a defined neighborhood.
Play_video
Relatively Prime Two integers with no common factors other than one are said to be Relatively Prime.
Play_video
Remainder When a divisor does not divide evenly into the dividend, we have a Remainder.
Play_video
Revolutions per Minute Abbreviated "rpm," it conveys the number of complete circular rotations that occur every 60 seconds at some constant rate of revolution.
Play_video
Rho Lower-case Rho, the 17th letter of the Greek alphabet, is often used for density (mass per unit volume) in physics.
Play_video
Right Angle An angle of 90 degrees or pi/2 radians.
Perpendicular lines meet at Right Angles.
Play_video
Right Triangle A triangle with a right angle.
Play_video
Root (Number) The Root of a given Number is the value that raised to the power of the root returns the given number. Play_video
Root Mean Square Abbreviated RMS it is the square root of the arithmetic mean of the squares of some real values, as from a data set.
Play_video
Root, Number The Root of a given Number is the value that raised to the power of the root returns the given number.
Play_video
Rotation Movement in a circulation or circular fashion, often around a point or an axis, is termed Rotation.
Play_video
Rounding Not exactly truncating, rounding involves reduction in the precision of a value to approximate that value to some exact value with less precision.
Play_video
Sample When we Sample a population we typically seek a representative Sample.
Play_video
Sample Space We often use Sample Space to designate all the possibilities of potential outcomes for an event or process.
Play_video
Scalar A value with unit of size (magnitude) and no direction is termed a Scalar.
Contrast with a vector that has both magnitude and direction; a Scalar has magnitude but no direction.
Play_video
Scalene A triangle is considered Scalene if no two sides have the same length.
Play_video
Scatterplot A planar plot of points from two variables with each point representative of a datum from both variables, most often with some relation or correlation.
Play_video
Scientific Notation Scientific Notation is an easy way to represent either very large numbers or very small numbers.
Large numbers are expressed with positive powers of ten; small numbers are expressed with negative powers of ten.
Such numbers often represent physical quantities or values that would be inconvenient or cumbersome to write with typical decimal representations.
Play_video
Second, Degree While "second degree" applies to a polynomial, a single Second with respect to Degree measure is one-sixtieth of one minute, or one sixtieth of one sixtieth of one degree, or 1/1,296,000 of a revolution.
Play_video
Second, Time One sixtieth of a minute, or 1/3600 of an hour, is one Second of Time.
Play_video
Second-Order Polynomial A polynomial in which the highest-order term is of order two.
The highest power in second-order univariate (one variable) polynomial is two; the degree of such a polynomial is degree two.
Play_video
Segment, Circle A portion of a circle bounded by a chord and the circle itself.
Play_video
Segment, Line A Line Segment is a set of collinear points bounded on both ends with, literally, endpoints.
Play_video
Semicircle Half a circle; the portion of a circle on one side of a diameter.
Play_video
Series Most often a sequence of terms to be summed.
Informally, any sequence of terms may be a Series.
Play_video
Set Any collection of objects or values is considered a Set, whose cardinal number is the number of objects in the Set.
Play_video
Set Intersection The Intersection of two (or more) Sets is the subset common to both (or all) Sets.
Logically, the Intersection of two Sets A and B is literally the Set of "A and B."
Play_video
Set Union The Union of two (or more) Sets is the Set that contains both (or all) Sets.
Logically, the Union of two Sets A and B is the Set of elements contained in either Set A or B, literally "A or B."
Play_video
Sigma The 18th letter of the Greek alphabet, upper-case sigma is used for summation notation, lower-case Sigma often denotes a standard deviation in statistics.
Play_video
Significant Digits Informally, Digits that are not zero.
Slightly more formally, nonzero Digits as well as zeros between nonzero Digits.
Strictly, the number of Digits required to express a calculated value to within the reasonable tolerance or uncertainty of calculation.
Play_video
Simple Closed Curve A planar figure that neither crosses itself or contains a gap is a Simple Closed Curve; note that a curve can be "straight" according to the mathematicians.
Play_video
Simple Harmonic Motion Periodic Motion with constant length of cycle time (a fixed period) is termed Simple Harmonic Motion.
Play_video
Simplify To express (or rewrite) in more concise terms.
To make simpler.
Play_video
Simultaneous Equations Equations with common solutions are Simultaneous Equations.
Also, equivalent equalities (statements with equal signs) may be termed Simultaneous Equations.
Play_video
Skew Lines neither intersecting nor parallel (non-coplanar lines) are termed Skew lines.
Play_video
Slope A number associated with a line graphed in a plane, Slope is the ratio of rise over run, an indication of the steepness of the line.
We may write a line as y = mx + b and use the value of m for Slope.
Play_video
Slope-Intercept Equation of a Line The familiar y = mx + b, where m represents Slope and b is the y-Intercept.
Play_video
Solid A three-dimensional geometric figure or body that includes the interior region.
Play_video
Solution Too often in math class, "the answer." More directly, a Solution is a value (or set of values) that makes a mathematical statement true.
Play_video
Solution Set Strictly, any Solution is a Solution Set, the value(s) that make a mathematical statement true.
Play_video
Speed A (typically fixed) ratio of length or distance to a unit of time; Speed is a scalar value, as in miles per hour (mph) or feet per second (fps).
Play_video
Sphere A three-dimensional figure comprised of points equidistant from a center point; a Sphere has a fixed radius.
Play_video
Square 1 (noun) - the regular quadrilateral that is both equilateral and equiangular.
2 (noun) - the result of multiplying a number times itself.

3 (verb) - the operation of multiplying a number times itself; equivalently raising it to second power, or to the exponent 2.
Play_video
Square Matrix A Square Matrix has the same number of rows as columns.
Play_video
Square Root Given a real value, the number that times itself (squared) produces the given value. Play_video
SSS Congruence Two triangles whose corresponding sides are congruent are themselves congruent.
Play_video
Standard Equation of a Line When expressing the Equation of a Line with integral coefficients we may have the Standard Equation of a Line.
Play_video
Standard Position An angle in Standard Position has been rotated counterclockwise (for positive rotation) from an initial ray on the positive x-axis.
Play_video
Stem-and-Leaf Plot A graphical device to group statistical data, typically by leading digits.
Play_video
Step Function A discontinuous Function where the range jumps in increments (usually fixed) may be a Step Function.
Play_video
Straight Angle An angle of 180 degrees or pi radians.
Play_video
Strict Inequality A Strict Inequality is an inequality that does not include an "or equal to...".
Strict inequality only apply to unequal values, as one is either greater than (>) or less than (<) the other.
Play_video
Subset Every set is a Subset of itself.
A Subset has elements all contained in a "parent" set.
Play_video
Subtraction The operation we begin thinking of as "take away" or "minus" is a way to find the difference between values.
Play_video
Sum The result of addition.
Play_video
Symmetry Having a like but reversed profile or image (a mirror image) about a line is having the quality of Symmetry about the axis (of Symmetry).
Play_video
System of Equations Most generally simultaneous Equations, or a set of Equations with identical variables.
Play_video
Tangent Line A Line is said to be Tangent to a function when it touches the graph of the function at a single point.
Play_video
Tau Tau is the 19th letter of the Greek alphabet.
Play_video
Term In most mathematical expressions a single Term is isolated from other Terms by plus or minus signs.
A Term is the same as a Monomial, in casual mathematical language.
More strictly, a Term is a Monomial with no coefficient.
Play_video
Tessellate A planar pattern of repeating geometric shapes is a Tessellation; to produce these shapes is to Tessellate.
Play_video
Third Quartile For certain types of data, it is the 75th percentile.
Also high quartile or upper quartile.
Play_video
Three Dimensions The Dimensions of space or volume are Three Dimensions, typically labeled with rectangular, spherical, or cylindrical coordinates.
Play_video
Transitive Property The Transitive Property is exhibited when three values are related in the following manner: If A = B and B = C, then A = C.
The relation need not be equality.
Play_video
Transversal A line that crosses two or more parallel lines is often termed a Transversal.
Play_video
Triangle A three-sided polygon.
Triangles are either acute, right, or obtuse.
Play_video
Trinomial A polynomial with three terms. Play_video
Triple As a verb, Triple means to multiply by three.
As a noun, the result from multiplication by three.
Play_video
Truncation Replace the lesser digits of some number with zeros with no regard for rounding; this is Truncation.
Play_video
Two Dimensions A plane has Two Dimensions.
Planar figures are Two Dimensional.
Play_video
Uncountable In human terms, Uncountable means too many to practically count or enumerate.
In math, an infinite function without a one-to-one correspondence to natural numbers.
Play_video
Uniform Constant and unchanging; fixed.
Play_video
Union The Union of two or more sets is the set of elements from all the sets.
The Union of sets A and B is literally the set "A and B."
Play_video
Upper Quartile Also the high quartile, the 75th percentile.
Play_video
Upper Quintile Also high quintile, the 80th percentile.
Play_video
Upsilon Upsilon is the 20th letter of the Greek alphabet.
Play_video
Variable A Variable is a symbol, most often a letter, to represent a quantity that may change value, that is literally to vary in its value.
Play_video
Velocity Formally a vector in physics, Velocity has both magnitude (speed) and direction, as in miles per hour (mph) northwest (NW) or feet per second (fps) upward. Play_video
Venn Diagram Most often graphics of overlapping circles and ovals, a Venn Diagram depicts sets, subsets, and their intersections and unions.
Play_video
Verify To confirm is to Verify.
When we Verify, we prove or establish some assertion to a dependable conclusion independent from bias.
There is wisdom in these words: "Trust, but Verify."
Play_video
Vertex A "corner" of a polygon is a Vertex; an extremum of a conic section is a Vertex; the endpoint(s) of rays that form an angle is a Vertex.
Play_video
Vertical Straight up, perpendicular to horizontal, is Vertical.
Vertical lines have an indeterminate or infinite slope.
Play_video
Vertical Angles When two lines cross (intersect) they form two pairs of Vertical Angles; the Angles within each pair of Vertical Angles are congruent. Play_video
Vertical Line Test Given a relation between x and y expressed as y = f(x), the relation is a function if the graph passes the Vertical Line Test; no vertical line may cross the graph more than once.
No single element from the domain of x may generate more than a single value of y mapped into the range, to be considered a function.
Play_video
Volume The extent to which an object fills units of three-dimensional space is its Volume.
Play_video
Weighted Average When several factors comprise a score or calculation and the factors have different amounts of importance to the overall result, a Weighted Average may be calculated by assigning more importance (or "weight") to one factor over another.
Play_video
Whole Numbers Most often, the set of positive integers and zero.
Play_video
x-Intercept Where a graph crosses (intersects) the x-axis in rectangular or Cartesian coordinates is termed an X-Intercept.
Play_video
x-y Plane The familiar coordinate plane.
The x-axis is almost universally horizontal; the y-axis is subsequently vertical.
Or, the Plane of X-Y in three-dimensional space with ordered triples (x, y, z).
Play_video
x-z Plane In three dimensions, the plane orthogonal to the y-axis.
Play_video
Xi The 14th letter of the Greek alphabet.
Play_video
y-Intercept The point where a function graph crosses (intersects) the y-axis is termed the Y-Intercept.
In the familiar linear equation form (Slope-Intercept form) of y = mx + b, the value of b is the Y-Intercept.
Play_video
y-z Plane In three dimensions, the plane orthogonal to the x-axis.
Play_video
Zero The only real value that is neither negative nor positive.
It is an integer value.
Play_video
Zero Slope When the calculation of Slope is Zero there is a rise of Zero over any value of run.
Most generally, a horizontal line has Zero Slope.
Play_video
Zero, Function The Zero of a Function is the x value for which the output, y, of the function is zero; provided, of course, that y = f(x).
Play_video
Zeta The sixth letter of the Greek alphabet.
Play_video

Please send us an email with your suggestions for this glossary. We at Mr. X want this site to be as helpful as possible.
 
Sample Arithmetic Problems | Math Glossary | Solving Algebra Problems | Trig Homework | Homework Help with Algebra | Learn Trigonometry | Math Glossary Geometry | Calculus Glossary